Unless otherwise specified all photographs are courtesy of John Rodsted AUSTRALIAN NETWORK TO BAN LANDMINES AND CLUSTER MUNITIONS Safe Ground. In the early 1990s in response to the global landmine situation Sister Patricia Pak Poy of Adelaide famously said “Somebody should do something about this”- and then promptly did something. At the same time, in different parts of the world others had a similar idea and so was born the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. The Australian movement became the International Campaign to Ban Landmines-Australian Network Inc. with Pat as its founder and first National Coordinator The aim of the campaign was straightforward, to bring about a ban on the use, production, transfer and stockpiling of landmines. The campaign was spectacularly successful and the Mine Ban Treaty came into being in 1997. Much has changed since that time as more and more countries have rebelled against the abhorrent nature of indiscriminate legacy weapons. We now have a treaty against the use of cluster munitions called the Convention on Cluster Munitions. This is steadily  growing in influence and power as more countries join and agree to be bound by its obligations. The International Campaign to Ban Landmines- Australian Network Inc mutated into the Australian Network to Ban Landmines and then, in recognition of our constant work against the use of cluster munitions, into the Australian Network to Ban Landmines and Cluster Munitions. In early 2010 we considered changing to a broader, more generic name, which was not tied to a specific call for a ban on landmines and cluster munitions. For various reasons we did not make such a decision at that time but the potential need for such a change has remained with us. So much has been achieved in the last 25-30 years that while many challenges remain the same, many new ones have arisen and more will continue to arise. So much of our world is unsafe ground for a wide variety of different reasons. We can help to make that ground safe and to prevent current safe ground from becoming unsafe. The National Committee feels it is now time to recognise that we have passed the stage where we need to call for a ban on landmines and cluster munitions. There is of course much additional work still to be done in regard to landmines and cluster munitions but we must also be cognisant of a changed world and the need to remain relevant and attractive to new and current members. With this as our goal, the committee recommends that our name should now become Safe Ground. This seems to encapsulate our fundamental reason for existence and as a result we will put that proposal to a special General Meeting, the date of which will be announced shortly to all members. Our suggested mission statements are: Restore lives Protect livelihoods Empower communities. Everyone deserves a safe future. While we consider that the bulk of our work would, initially at least, remain with landmines and cluster munitions we need to recognise that there are also many other forms of unexploded ordnance. For example many of the islands in the Pacific are still contaminated from unexploded ordnance, other than landmines and cluster bombs, left from World War II. We hope that you will continue to support us as we work towards a world free of landmines, cluster bombs and other Explosive Remnants of War, while advocating for unsafe ground to become safe and to prevent safe ground from becoming unsafe. Unless otherwise specified all photographs are courtesy of John Rodsted          Unless otherwise specified all photographs are courtesy of John Rodsted